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Posts Tagged ‘spaced satin stitch’

For the second square in my pulled work embroidery sampler, I decided to try some pulled satin stitches. All embroiderers are familiar with using the normal satin stitch, but a pulled satin stitch differs in that it pulls the threads of the fabric together (or apart) to create a pattern.

A spaced satin stitch can have different variations from just changing the length or number of stitches or the spaces between the sets of stitches. The particular combination below resembles a bricked pattern or wavy line when completed.

The black dot is where the thread comes to the front. The solid lines represent the thread on the front of the fabric, and the dotted lines are the thread on the back.

Spaced satin stitch is worked from side to side. The black dot is where the thread comes to the front. The solid lines represent the thread on the front of the fabric, and the dotted lines are the thread on the back. The grid paper represents the thread count of the fabric.

As for the first post in this series, when you come to end of the row take the thread from the top of one row to the bottom of the next. This makes it easier to maintain an even tension at the edges of your work.

A stepped satin stitch can be done in many different combinations and below it is shown in a checked pattern. I struggled to get the spacing correct in my sampler, but it does help to have it graphed or sketched out on paper beforehand!

This stitch is worked in sets diagonally.

The stepped satin stitch is worked in sets diagonally.

A basketweave stitch is just satin stitch placed close in sets with each set in an alternating direction, and it resembles weaving once completed. It is difficult to separate out the threads of the fabric once you have already pulled a set closed, which is why my example has a extra strand between each set.

This stitch is worked either up and down or side to side.

Basketweave stitch is worked either up and down or side to side.

My finished square looks like this:

The top half is in spaced satin stitch. The bottom half is in stepped satin stitch and basketweave stitch.

The top half is in spaced satin stitch. The bottom half is in stepped satin stitch (left) and basketweave stitch (right).

I really liked how the spaced satin stitch turned out. The other two stitches might require a bit more practise on my part, and if they covered a larger area they might look more effective.

Part Three of this series follows!

Related Posts

Pulled Work Embroidery Sampler: Part One

Making a Pair of Lawn Ruffles – with whitework

A Regency Letter Case

Sources and Relevant Links

Pulled Stitches – by Lynxlace – This site has many many different variations of pulled stitches, with some free patterns for samplers as well.

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