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Posts Tagged ‘hat trimmings’

Parisian bonnets from Ackermann's Repository (1817)

“Parisian Head Dresses” from Ackermann’s Repository (1817)

At the Jane Austen Festival in 2013, I did a workshop on making a bonnet from buckram. I have always wanted to do more millinery but have struggled to know where to start without proper tuition, so this workshop was very exciting for me!

The pattern was of a late Regency bonnet, circa 1817, and was provided as part of the workshop. The basic materials (buckram, wire, and pellon) were also provided. We were set to work handsewing the strips of metal wire to the edges of the buckram.

In millinery, the buckram is cut to the desired shape and the wire is used to hold the buckram in this shape. For this reason it is important to pre-shape the wire to the desired shape before attaching it to the buckram. It is also important to double check that the part of the hat that sits on the head will fit your head!

The buckram top and brim, partially assembled

The buckram crown and brim, partially assembled. This is as far as I got in the class.

Once I got home, I sprayed the assembled buckram frame with a spray-on adhesive and stuck the pellon (thin layer of padding) to it. The pellon pieces covered the entire outer sections of the hat, as well as the inside brim area. The inside of the bonnet had no pellon.

The buckram frame fully assembled with the pellon adhered

The buckram frame fully assembled with the pellon adhered

Then the fabric was cut out and handstitched to the frame. The fabric was cut out in 6 pieces: the outer top, the inner top, the outer side, the inner side, the outer brim, the inner brim. The fabric I chose for the inner sections was different to the fabric I chose for the outer sections, thereby creating a contrasting lining.

The bonnet with the fabric handsewn on

The bonnet with the fabric handsewn on

Then I decorated it. The trimmings were all sewn on by hand after the hat was finished. This means that the trimmings can be easily removed and replaced later to create a new look.

All finished!

All finished!

"Parisian Bonnets" from Ackermann's Repository (1817)

“Parisian Bonnets” from Ackermann’s Repository (1817)

The piped band and ribbon flowers were both made by me (the links are below), and I obtained the ostrich feather from my local craft store.

These pictures from Ackermann’s Repository helped provide ideas of how these bonnets were trimmed at this time. I particularly wanted mine to match the Regency spencer I have just finished. Now I have a lovely bonnet-and-spencer ensemble! For my first-ever buckram hat, I am pretty pleased with how it turned out.

I really loved the opportunity to work with buckram because the skills I have acquired give me so much more versatility to my hatmaking. Now I am able to purchase other hat patterns or draft my own to make my own range of hats.

Hats are my cup of tea!

Related Posts

How to make a piped band

Making Ribbon Flowers

How to make a Regency Poke Bonnet in Ten Steps

Making a Regency Spencer

Jane Austen Festival – Australia, 2013

Sources and Relevant Links

Image Source: Regency Era Fashions from Ackermann’s Repository 1817 – by EKDuncan “My Fanciful Muse”

The Repository of Arts, Literature, Commerce, Manufactures, Fashions and Politics, by Ackermann – read various volumes online

How to make a Regency stovepipe bonnet from buckram – Youtube tutorial (The author recommends using millinery wire as I have done, but does not use it in this particular tutorial.)

Covering a Regency stovepipe bonnet – Youtube tutorial (The author shows how to cover a buckram frame. I sewed, rather than glued, mine.)

From the Neck Up: An Illustrated Guide to Hatmaking, by Denise Dreher – this book has many ideas for hat patterns, as well as construction steps and decorating ideas.

Jane Austen Festival, Australia – website

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Costumes Parisiens, from Les Modes Dames (1817)

Costumes Parisiens, from Journal des Dames et des Modes (1817)

Historically, hats have always been trimmed in a variety of different ways. Flowers and feathers were very common trimmings, but artificial fruits, ribbon, lace and different types of fabric also were frequently used.

It is always a puzzle to me to figure out exactly how different trimmings were made, and my task this week was to come up with something for a bonnet that I am finishing.

I decided that a ribbon flower was what was needed and my inspiration was a fashion plate printed in 1817 in Journal des Dames et des Modes. I liked the look of the several flowery-looking (or maybe bow-looking) things in this picture, which are additionally adorned with feathers. Here are my efforts!

Step One: Take the ribbon and fold it to make the first petal. Here I have used two contrasting layers of ribbon that have been laid on top of each other. Gather the petal at the base.

Gather the first "petal".

The first “petal” gathered

Step Two: The second petal can be done in the same way, leaving about an inch of space between them.

The second petal

The second petal

Step Three: Keep going in the same way until you have the number of petals you want. I wanted a flower with four petals.

The four petals completed

The four petals completed

Step Four: Arrange the petals in the way they will sit and tack them in place in the centre of the “flower”.

The petals are tacked in place through the middle of the flower.

The petals are tacked in place through the middle of the flower.

Step Five: Turning to the back of the flower, pinch together the top layer of two adjoining petals and do a small stitch to hold them together.

Tacking the top layer of the petals together

Tacking the top layer of the petals together

This will have the effect of the petals sitting closely together and being more puffy and round.

The resulting "flower"

The resulting “flower”

Step Six: For the centre of the flower, a covered button will work wonderfully. Unfortunately the centre of my flower was too large for a button to work well, so I made a “yo-yo” by cutting a circle of material and gathering the edge. The diameter of the circle should be double the diameter of the finished centre.

The circle, gathered at the edge

The circle, gathered around the edge

Step Seven: Pull the threads to bunch up the material.

The little "puff"

The little “puff”

Step Eight: Tack the centre piece to the flower, making the stitches as invisible as possible.

The finished flower!

The finished flower!

The finished flower can now be attached to a hat.

Hopefully this bonnet will be featured in my next post, once I finish trimming it!

Related Posts

How to use Ribbon to make Decorative Trims

How to make a piped band

Sources and Relevant Links

Image Source: The Costumer’s Manifesto

From the Neck Up: An Illustrated Guide to Hatmaking, by Denise Dreher – a great book on hatmaking and trimming

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Regency spencer sleeve, c. 1815.

Regency spencer sleeve, c. 1815. The bands that are tucked inside the sleeve head appear to have been piped.

Finding ways to reproduce elements of historic clothing can be difficult, particularly when it is unusual or when viewing or handling the garment is impractical or not allowed. Sometimes historic handsewing has produced more tricky or fiddly aspects on a garment, which can be harder with a sewing machine. And sometimes it is all about learning something that you haven’t tried before!

This weekend I spent a considerable amount of time trying to figure out how to do multiple strips of piping together to form a band. I have been keen to use this on a garment I am making but working out how it might have been done (and then figuring out how I might be able to reproduce it) was quite difficult. I have detailed my efforts below.

Step One

Cut a wide bias strip in the fabric you want to have piped. Cut another strip of fabric on the grain for lining. Position your cording along the inside of the bias strip in the same way that you would for normal piping. Pin your lining strip underneath, right sides together, and sew using a zipper foot.

The material to be piped is on top, with the cording pinned in place. The lining sits underneath to be caught in this first line of stitching.

The material to be piped is on top, with the cording pinned in place. The lining sits underneath to be caught in this first line of stitching.

Step Two

The lining strip is then turned under to form the “underlayer” of the band. The raw edge of the lining should be trimmed and turned inside to meet the other raw edges.

The remaining raw edge of the lining is folded to the inside of the band.

The remaining raw edge of the lining is folded to the inside of the band.

This raw edge will be caught in the next line of stitching.

Step Three

Pin the next line of cording inbetween the lining and the outer fabric and sew, making sure that the fabric and cord is pushed close to the first line of piping to form a ridge.

The next row of cording is pinned in position ready to sew.

The next row of cording is pinned in position ready to sew.

The underneath should look like this:

Under the piped band

Under the piped band before sewing the second row of piping.

Continue on in the same way, sewing the desired number of rows of piping until you have reached the last one.

Push the cord close to the previous row of piping to get that characteristic bulge in the material.

Push the cord close to the previous row of piping to get that characteristic bulge in the material.

Step Four

Once you have reached the last row of piping you will need to trim your material. Lay your cord against the material to give yourself a guide of how much may need to be trimmed. Once the excess is cut off, fold the material over the cord, tuck the raw edge into the edge of the lining, and handsew it in place.

Handsewing the last row of cording in place

Handsewing the last row of cording in place

The band of piping is now finished!

The finished band should look something like this.

The finished band should look something like this.

Piped bands make an interesting addition to a hat.

Piped bands make an interesting addition to a hat.

I really like how it turned out, especially because it looks different to the normal things for sale in dressmaking and craft shops. This decorative band can be used as a thicker alternative to ribbon or as a trim on hats or costumes. I will be using this band on the new Regency spencer I am currently working on. I also plan to use something similar on this late Regency bonnet.

Related Posts

How to use Ribbon to make Decorative Trims

Sources and Relevant Links

Image Source: from Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA)

How to make and attach your own piping

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