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Archive for the ‘Regency era’ Category

A skelelton suit From Victoria and Albert Museum.

A skelelton suit made from nankeen, c. 1800. From Victoria and Albert Museum.

My family and I are heading off to a Regency Picnic held in Melbourne in March, so I am madly doing costumes for some of my children who don’t have anything to wear as yet. My two-year-old boy is one of these, and I decided to make him a Regency skeleton suit.

Skeleton suits became increasingly popular during the 1780’s and 1790’s, and they continued to be used until the 1840’s. The suit most often comprised a long-sleeved jacket, with matching long pants (with a fall-front) that could be buttoned together to form a type of romper suit. Sometimes the jacket could be short-sleeved, and the jacket collar varies from a short, stand-up collar, to one with fold-down lapels, and sometimes even no collar.

The suit set occasionally included a matching waistcoat that could likewise be buttoned to the pants. The pants were sometimes more similar to short breeches (reaching only to the knee), but most often were to the ankle. They also could have a button placket at the bottom of the pant leg to aid in dressing. Buttons were often self-covered to match the suit, but could also be metal.

Skeleton suit From

Skeleton suit of brown satin, worn by Danish King Frederik 7th as a boy, c. 1800. From the Danish National Museum. (Patterned and available online)

Underneath this suit the child generally wore a boy’s shirt, which was a version of the man’s shirt popular in the 18th century. In the previous post in this series I made a little boy’s shirt, and in this post I will share my progress in making the boy’s pants.

Pattern

I used a pattern online, which was taken from an existing skeleton suit in the Danish National Museum. It does need to be scaled up and then – because it is about an 8-year-old size – I had to adjust it significantly so it fitted a small child. Seam allowances need to be added as well.

I took a raft of measurements and used these to roughly alter the pattern. It is a great idea to do a mock up in cheap fabric, just to make sure you have a workable pattern, before doing the real thing.

Measurements to take:

  • Waist circumference (a high waist, that is)
  • Hip circumference
  • Crotch to ankle length
  • Crotch to waist length
  • Various measurements around the leg (to check that the pant legs are wide enough)

The pants were made from burgundy cotton broadcloth, with wooden buttons.

Construction Steps

As this pattern comes with minimal instructions, I have decided to detail my steps here.

Step One: I cut out the pattern in a similar way to the breeches I have made before. It is really the shape of the pattern that you want to replicate, regardless of the size of the person. In particular the back panel piece is shaped to give the pants a “splayed leg” appearance, which allows movement for horse-riding. The baggy seat of the pants is part of this.

Step Two: I sewed the two inside leg seams first (the front piece to the back piece), and then I sewed the crotch seam (which is the centre back seam and the centre front seam, joining in the crotch).

The side seams are sewn and the crotch seam is pinned, ready to sew.

The inside leg seams are sewn and the crotch seam is pinned, ready to sew.

Step Three: Before the side leg seams are sewn, it is a good idea to sew the fall front. I did this a bit differently than I have done before. First I laid the front panels together and made a slash through both layers. This made the slashes both even.

The front panel of the pants sits right sides together, and a slash is made for the fall front.

The front panels of the pants sit right sides together, and a slash is made through both layers for the fall front.

Second, I cut a rectangular piece of material about an inch wide and folded (and ironed) 5mm in from each long edge. I sewed this piece (right sides together) to the side of the slash that is closest to the centre front (the one that actually forms the fall front). I used a 5mm seam allowance, tapering to a smaller allowance at the bottom of the slash. The rectangular portion was then folded to the inside to cover the raw edge, similar to the way bias-binding binds raw edges.

The stitching line was hard to see so I have overlaid it with a red line.

This is the inside of the front panel. The slash is parted and folded back and I have marked the stitching line with a red line to make it easier to see.

Third, I cut two pieces to go under the fall; I call them “under-fall-flaps” for want of a better description! These two pieces will be attached to the waistband and to the outer slashed edge. I hemmed the bottom edge of both pieces and also the edges that are closest to the centre front.

These two pieces are places under the fall front.

These two pieces sit under the fall front. Only the bottom edge is hemmed in this photo.

I then sewed these pieces to the other side of the slashed edge, using a seam allowance of 5mm, tapering to a smaller allowance at the bottom. These “under-fall-flap” pieces can then be folded to the inside to sit under the fall. The raw edges do need to be neatened, which I did with a very tight zig zag.

The underpiece is pinned to the other side of the slash, right sides together.

The “under-fall-flap” is pinned, ready to sew, to the other side of the slash, right sides together.

Lastly, I trimmed the bottom of the rectangular piece to form a neat little point. This covers any raw edges at the bottom of the slash, and is top-stitched for reinforcement. I have never done this type of fall front before, but I think it looks really good!

The reinforcing stitching at the bottom of the fall front.

The reinforcing stitching at the bottom of the fall front.

At this point, the outside leg seams can both be sewn. This is also the point that the side pockets can be assembled. This pattern has two pockets (one in each side seam), plus a third welt pocket through the waistband. I did not put any pockets into my pants though.

Step Four: The waistband can be interfaced, especially since it is generally so wide. I sewed the waistband piece and the waistband facing (seen here with the interfacing ironed on) together on three sides, with one long edge of the facing folded up and left unsewn.

The waistband

The waistband sewn, with one edge of the facing folded up. This folded up section is used to hide the raw edges once the waistband is sewn on.

The pants can then be sewn to the waistband. For this part, the fall front is left free (to be buttoned to the waistband later), but the “under-fall-flaps” are sewn to the waistband instead. The centre back portion of the pants is gathered to fit the waistband, thereby providing the baggy seat.

The pants have been sewn to the waistband, and all raw edges have been tucked under the facing and it is pinned, ready to hand sew down.

The pants have been sewn to the waistband, and all raw edges have been tucked under the facing. It is pinned, ready to hand sew down. The fall front can be seen pulled down in the centre.

Step Five: The buttons and buttonholes can be sewn to the front.

The buttons on the fall front.

The buttons on the fall front.

Note: In the pattern, the fall reaches higher than the top of the pants so it can be buttoned on to the waistband. Unfortunately I trimmed it off by mistake, so I had to sew a wide “binder” piece onto the top of the fall to use for buttoning.

Step Six: The button placket on the pant legs was used to help the foot go through tightly fitted pants. These pants weren’t particular tight, but I thought it might be a nice touch to include them. Firstly I cut a rectangular piece of fabric about 2 inches wide and folded it in half. (It needs to be as long as you want your placket to be.) According to the pattern, this placket is actually cut as part of the leg piece but I forgot to include it. The buttons are put on this flap and it is tucked under the other edge to be buttoned up.

The pant legs, shown with a button placket.

The pant legs, shown with a button placket.

The top edge of the placket can be sewn and turned the right way. Once that is done, the long edge of the placket can be sewn to the back side of the leg seam.

The placket sewn on.

The placket sewn on (the longer red line). The top edge of the placket was sewn first and turned the right way (shown by a short red line).

The placket can be then folded to the inside, the raw edges can be tucked under and then it can be sewn down.

The placket has been folded to the inside and pinned down, ready to be sewn.

The placket has been folded to the inside and pinned down, ready to be hand sewn.

On the other seam (opposite to the placket), I sewed a little rectangular piece of material. This was to reinforce it so that the buttonholes could be put here.

On the other side to the button placket, is a small piece of material used as reinforcement for the buttonholes.

On the other side to the button placket, is a small piece of material used as reinforcement for the buttonholes.

Then the buttons and buttonholes can both be put on. I put extra buttonholes in the placket so that, when I let down the pants, all I have to do is put more buttons on the bottom.

The button placket complete.

The button placket complete.

Step Seven: The pants can be hemmed at the bottom. Three more buttonholes should be put in the waistband, at the centre back and one on each side, for buttoning to the jacket.

All finished!

The front view

The front view

The back view

The back view

Stay tuned for the final post in this series, the jacket. – coming soon!

Related Posts

Making a Skeleton Suit – a boy’s shirt

The Making of a Midshipman: Breeches

MY Mr Knightley: Making Breeches

Sources and Relevant Links

The 2nd Annual Melbourne Regency Picnic – an Event on the Facebook page

Image Source: A nankeen skeleton suit – from Victoria and Albert Museum

Image Source: A skeleton suit – from the Danish National Museum

Skeleton suit pattern – from Regency Society of America forum boards (This particular page has two patterns, one for a girl’s dress and one for a boy’s skeleton suit. Just scroll down for the skeleton suit pattern.)

Costume for a Regency Child – by The Oregon Regency Society

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Image from Oregon Regency Society

Image from Oregon Regency Society

This March my family and I will be venturing out in public in all our Regency regalia! The 2nd Annual Melbourne Regency Picnic will be held on March 6th and I am very excited to go for the first time. It will be a lovely relaxing day out for our family, but the bit that is not as relaxing is getting all the children “kitted out” before then!

I decided to start with my youngest daughter, a sweet 5-year-old, and make her a quick costume using a pattern I have done before.

Pattern

The pattern for this dress is a free one available online, and it is the one I have used before, in “How to make a Basic Regency Girl’s Dress”. It requires scaling up, but it is fairly easy to put together using modern dressmaking methods.

I made some slight alterations to the pattern for this gown, such as omitting the thin side bodice panel, and bringing the drawstring casing all the way around the waistline (rather than only to the side seams).

Construction

The steps that I used were very similar to that for the basic Regency girl’s dress I have done before, so I will not detail all of the steps again here. Instead I will briefly outline some of the features that I decided on for this outfit.

Features of this dress:

  • Simple bodice, with a centre front panel and two back panels;
  • Slightly flared skirt, with lace around the bottom (and a deep hem for later taking-down);
  • Short sleeves, with the fullness pleated over the sleeve head, the bottom edge ungathered and finished with a lace edging;
  • Drawstring casing around the neckline and the waistline, which fastens with ties at the back.

This was a nice, quick weekend project, and the best part is that little girls need very little fitting!

The front view

The front view

The back view

The back view

A lovely floral fervour for my littlest flower-petal!

Related Posts

How to make a Basic Regency Girl’s Dress

Drafting a Pattern for a Girl’s Regency gown

Sources and Relevant Links

Image Source: Costumes for a Regency Child, from The Oregon Regency Society

Free pattern for a girl’s Regency dress – on Regency Society of America forum board

The 2nd Annual Melbourne Regency Picnic – the Event, from the Facebook page

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My current project, the quilt “Jane Austen’s Bonnet” by Brenda Ryan, is coming along nicely!

This quilt is a wall-hanging, and features 20 diamond patches that are embroidered with various stitcheries on a Regency theme. The embroideries are nicely framed within the patchwork structure of the quilt and the result is very pretty.

I began work on some of the pretty pictures this time, and I have included two of them here.

Firstly, a pretty Regency lady!

A pretty Regency lady!

The back of a pretty Regency lady!

The stitches I have used are: split stitch, backstitch, colonial knots, running stitch, stem stitch, blanket stitch, and satin stitch. There is also a little bit of ribbon embroidery in the hair.

Secondly, a lovely parasol.

A lovely beaded parasol

A green beaded parasol

The stitches I have used here are: back stitch, running stitch, stem stitch, colonial knots, and satin stitch. This one is also beaded and has two bows done with ribbon embroidery.

With all of these diamonds, I am stitching a quick running stitch around the outside of the piece to mark the stitching line, which I hope will be useful when I put the quilt together.

Stay tuned for Part Four of this series. – coming soon.

Related Posts

Jane Austen’s Bonnet – Part One

How to make an American Quilt

My English Paper Piecing Project

Sources and Relevant Links

Brenda Ryan Embroidery Designs

Jane Austen’s Bonnet – by Brenda Ryan Embroidery Designs

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One of the stitcheries from the "Jane Austen's Bonnet" quilt.

One of the stitcheries from the “Jane Austen’s Bonnet” quilt.

I am so excited about the beginnings of my next project, the quilt “Jane Austen’s Bonnet”, by Brenda Ryan.

This quilt is a wall-hanging, and features 20 diamond patches that are embroidered with various stitcheries on a Regency theme. The embroideries are nicely framed within the patchwork structure of the quilt and the result is very pretty.

I decided to begin with the four “quote” stitcheries, just to get my fingers in the mood!

This post contains the third and fourth embroideries that I have completed, but neither of these two quotes I have chosen are included in the original quilt design. For some reason, the two other quotes did not appeal to me much, so I searched up some more quotes and printed up a design on my computer that could be traced and then embroidered.

A quote from Persuasion.

A quote from “Persuasion”, by Jane Austen.

The above quote is from “Persuasion”, by Jane Austen, at the part where Captain Wentworth declares his undying love to Anne Elliot in a letter.

A quote from one of Jane Austen's letters to her sister, Cassandra.

A quote from one of Jane Austen’s letters.

This quote is from one of Jane Austen’s letters to her sister, Cassandra. It refers to a patchwork they are working on, using the English paper piecing method.

All of the writing has been stitched with 2 strands of DMC embroidery thread in a backstitch. I have also stitched a quick running stitch around the outside of the diamond to mark the stitching line, which I hope will be useful when I put the quilt together.

Stay tuned for Part Three of this series.

Related Posts

Jane Austen’s Bonnet – Part One

How to make an American Quilt

My English Paper Piecing Project

Sources and Relevant Links

Brenda Ryan Embroidery Designs

Jane Austen’s Bonnet – by Brenda Ryan Embroidery Designs

Read Full Post »

One of the stitcheries from the "Jane Austen's Bonnet" quilt.

One of the stitcheries from the “Jane Austen’s Bonnet” quilt.

For the last two years I have had a quilt on my to-do list, “Jane Austen’s Bonnet”, by Brenda Ryan.

I fell in love with this quilt when I saw one that a friend of mine had completed, and I decided that I would love to do one.

This quilt is a wall-hanging, and features 20 diamond patches that are embroidered with various stitcheries on a Regency theme. The embroideries are nicely framed within the patchwork structure of the quilt and the result is very pretty.

My colour scheme will be purple and green, and I will post my progress as I go. My plan is to post two stitcheries at a time, over 10 posts, with a final post on the finished quilt.

I decided to begin with the four “quote” stitcheries, just to get my fingers in the mood! Here are the first two.

The first two stitcheries for my quilt. The left one is a quote from "Pride and Prejudice", and the right one is taken from one of Jane's letters to her sister.

The first two stitcheries for my quilt.

The left quote is from the first line of “Pride and Prejudice”, by Jane Austen. The right one is taken from one of Jane’s letters to her sister. All of the writing has been stitched with 2 strands of DMC embroidery thread in a backstitch.

I have also stitched a quick running stitch around the outside of the diamond to mark the stitching line, which I hope will be useful when I put the quilt together.

Stay tuned for Part Two of this series.

Related Posts

How to make an American Quilt

My English Paper Piecing Project

Sources and Relevant Links

Brenda Ryan Embroidery Designs

Jane Austen’s Bonnet – by Brenda Ryan Embroidery Designs

Read Full Post »

Midshipman Robert Deans (1790-1867), oil painting by the British School, 19th century

Midshipman Robert Deans (1790-1867), oil painting by the British School – 1807

In this series of posts, I have been making the elements of a midshipman uniform employed in the British Navy during the years 1795 to 1812. In this post, I have been working on a cutaway tailcoat that was worn by midshipman during this period.

The midshipman tailcoat transitioned from before the 1790’s, when the front buttoned edge formed a large curve from the collar-bone, in to the sternum (where it would be fastened with often only two buttons), and then falling out past the waist and around to the back of the knees.

In contrast to this, the cutaway coat had a straight button-up front, where all of the buttons were functional, but at the belly there was a horizontal edge out to the pelvic bone, then beginning a curve down to behind the knees.

(c) National Maritime Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

A Portrait of a Midshipman – 1810 (c) National Maritime Museum; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation. Note that the double-breasted nature of the coat is incorrect.

The coat of a midshipman also had a high stand-up collar, with the white patch (with a button) of a midshipman rank. There were three decorative buttons on the cuffs, three decorative buttons underneath the corners of the flap pocket, a button to hold each of the two back pleats, and functional buttons down the centre front.

The above painting of Midshipman Deans (1807) is the clearest picture of the coat that I can find, as midshipmen portraits often only included the face and torso.

Hornblower had Pellew’s order as acting-lieutenant for two months now. Tomorrow he would take his examination. If he should pass the admiral would confirm the order the next day, and Hornblower would be a lieutenant with two months’ seniority already. But if he should fail! That would mean he had been found unfit for lieutenant’s rank. He would revert to midshipman, the two months’ seniority would be lost, and it would be six months at least before he could try again. Eight months’ seniority was a matter of enormous importance. It would affect all his subsequent career. 

Mr. Midshipman Hornblower, by C.S. Forester

I used the 1790's coat pattern in Norah Waugh's "Cut of Men's Clothes" as one of my references.

I used the 1790’s coat pattern in Norah Waugh’s “Cut of Men’s Clothes” as one of my references, particularly regarding pocket placement, sleeve shape, and the back pleating.

Pattern

In deciding what sort of pattern to use, I spent a bit of time researching coats from the 1790-1800 time frame. I looked particularly at the construction details in the 3-pointed-flap-pockets and the arrangement of the pleats. I found examples in the books Costume Close-up, by Linda Baumargarten and The Cut of Men’s Clothes, by Norah Waugh, and I also looked at as many paintings of midshipmen as I could find. (The downside with the paintings was that they rarely showed a full shot of the coat.)

Once I had determined where I wanted the seams and how high around the neck to have the collar, I laid the lining on my son’s body and “draped”, cutting a large allowance for seams (in case of mistakes!). Once the lining was pinned and adjusted to fit, I used these pieces to cut out the outer material.

This coat was made from navy woollen fabric (I think it was a wool/poly blend, actually). It was lined with ivory cotton broadcloth, and the buttons were a metal gold colour with a fouled anchor imprint on them.

Construction

For more step-by-step detail on making a tailcoat, you can refer to my similar post, MY Mr Knightley: Making a Regency Tailcoat. Several elements of this midshipman’s coat were done differently to my previous tailcoat, in particular the collar, the back pleats, and the pockets. Unfortunately my progress pictures were lost when I misplaced my camera’s SD card, so I am not able to include as much detail as I had planned to. Hopefully when I find them I can add them later!

Step One: The centre back seam, side seams and shoulder seams were sewn, for both the outer material and the lining.

Step Two: The sleeves were sewn together and attached to the coat. The sleeve lining was handsewn in to cover the raw edges of the sleeve seam, which had been pressed towards the sleeve.

Step Three: The pockets were made similar to a welt pocket (except without the outer welt). I made a slash through the outer fabric (not the lining) and then sewed one pocket-sized piece of broadcloth to the upper edge of the slash and one to the lower edge. These were turned to the inside, where the sides and bottom edges of the pocket pieces were sewn together. A three-cornered flap was then sewn to cover the slash, with three buttons decorating it.

The three-cornered flap pocket

The three-cornered flap pocket

Step Four: Around the tails of the coat and up to the cutaway area at the centre front, the raw edges of the lining and outer fabric were turned to the inside and handsewn with a topstitch. This was also done with the raw edges of the seams to be pleated in the tails. Once the raw edges of these seams had been sewn in, I made the pleats, pressed them, and hand sewed the seams together with a whipstitch. This seemed to help them sit flatter, but the wool does need a good deal of pressing to get it to pleat properly! Buttons were sewn at the top of the pleats to help hold them in place.

Step Five: The collar was lined with ivory cotton broadcloth and sewn to the neckline of the coat. I used a very similar pattern as I used for the collar of the waistcoat.

The midshipman patches were made using some white cotton broadcloth. Two layers were sewn together and then turned right-side-out. Buttonhole stitching was done across the centre of the patch and a small button sewn to the end of the patch. Then it was handsewn in place on the collar.

The midshipman badge on the collar.

The midshipman badge on the collar.

Step Six: The raw edges were turned in at the centre front and then handsewn with a topstitch through all thicknesses. The buttonholes were handsewn and buttons attached.

The buttonholes are handsewn with buttonhole stitch.

The buttonholes are handsewn with buttonhole stitch.

Step Six: The cuffs were made with only one layer of wool, just to make it a bit thinner. They were attached to the end of the sleeve and then turned up. Three gold-coloured metal buttons were sewn through all thicknesses to keep the cuff in place. Apparently as young lads’ arms grew longer, these buttons could be removed and the cuff pulled down to lengthen the sleeve, and then the buttons were reapplied.

The cuffs, with the non-functional buttons sewn on through the sleeve to hold the cuff in place.

The cuffs, with the non-functional buttons sewn on through the sleeve to hold the cuff in place.

The front view

The front view

The back view

The back view

I am very happy with the way the coat turned out. It does seem to attract a bit of dust and fluff, and could have done with a little brush before the photos!

It also probably should have been made a little bigger, as I think this little midshipman will grow out of it quite quickly. The other thing to note is that the collar on the waistcoat should have come up closer to the base of the neck, as it doesn’t quite sit properly with the coat collar.

For my next post in this series, I plan to make a midshipman’s full dress bicorn! – coming soon

For more details on my costuming posts, visit my page Costumes.

Related Posts

The Making of a Midshipman – the introduction

MY Mr Knightly: Making a Regency Tailcoat

Sources and Relevant Links

Image Source: Midshipman Robert Deans (1807) – at Royal Museums Greenwich

Image Source: A Portrait of a Midshipman (1810) – at BBC: Your Paintings (Painting details online at Royal Museums Greenwich – where it states that the double-breasted jacket is incorrect.)

Costume Close-up: Clothing Construction and Pattern 1750-1790, by Linda Baumgarten – buy on Amazon

The Cut of Men’s Clothes, by Norah Waugh – buy on Amazon

Sewing a Welt Pocket – by Craftsy

Buttons of the UK’s Royal navy – by Diana’s Buttons

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What a peaceful Regency setting!

My daughter at the previous festival in 2014.

A few months ago I went to the Jane Austen Festival in Canberra with my daughter, and I was eager to make her a new dress to wear. So, in addition to letting down a number of her other gowns, I set myself the task of drafting a pattern for her.

I have wanted to learn the art of draping for awhile too, where material is held onto the body (or dressmakers form) and cut, smoothed and pinned to fit. Generally speaking, the process most of us use is to pin our pattern piece to the material, which is cut and sewn and then finally fitted. However, many experienced dressmakers tell me that draping is a really good way to get an effective fit for a garment.

For this gown I did not have heaps of time to learn (and have the necessary trial and error achievements) for draping, so I thought I could try and drape using paper. Effectively I would be laying paper on the body and cutting around it to form the pattern pieces to use.

Construction Steps

Step One: I started with thinking about the type of gown I want to make; that is, thinking about its particular features. I wanted a gown with:

  • long skirts, but slightly flared,
  • a bodice with some gathers around the bottom of the bust,
  • no waistband,
  • short puffy sleeves over a longer under-sleeve,
  • button fastenings at the centre back.

I found it is also important to think about where the seams will be, which then tells you how many pieces your garment will have, and which of those pieces will be cut on the fold, etc…

Step Two: I held up a piece of paper against my daughter, starting with the back. I made a back bodice piece first, then the front bodice piece, and then a side bodice piece. I cut the paper roughly to size (its always important not to accidentally cut hair or clothes!!) and then neatened it up later.

The back bodice piece

The back bodice piece being cut out on the body.

As I cut the pattern pieces, I made them as I wanted them to look when finished, that is, I made them without seam allowances. This meant that the pieces needed to meet each other along the seamlines, and the centre front on-the-fold-line should be on the centre front line of the body. Likewise, the centre back area needed a bit extra for the overlap to place buttons and buttonholes (which I added to the pattern notations later).

The back bodice piece finished. The shoulder seam is set far back, as was the fashion during Regency.

The back bodice piece finished. The shoulder seam is set far back, as was the fashion during Regency.

I think it is actually more difficult to draft/drape with paper, as it is much hard to pin and hold in place. However, it felt a lot less scary than cutting into fabric while holding it on the body. I did throw out a few sheets of paper, as I inevitably made mistakes with my cutting lines!

Step Three: I wrote notations on my pattern pieces to stop me getting confused later. Things such as: notches to show which panel is joined to which; the centre front and back; grainlines; place-on-fold marks. You can see below that I made a reminder for myself to allow more at the centre back for the button placket that I intended to make.

These are the pattern pieces with the notations added. Once adjustments are made, the pattern pieces can be altered.

These are the pattern pieces with the notations added. Once fitting adjustments were made, the pattern pieces can be altered (which they were). It is also a good idea to name the pieces, which I haven’t done here.

When marking grainlines, it is a general rule that the grainline runs parallel to the centre front/back line (and perpendicular to the waistline).

Step Four: I began to cut out the bodice pieces. Just in case I had made a mistake, I allowed bigger seam allowances on all the side seams of the bodice and the centre back seams. This allowed me to have “room to move” to make some fitting adjustments later.

Step Five: The skirt pieces I cut out with reference to a pattern of an extant girl’s dress I have made before. My skirts were in three pieces (1 centre front piece cut on the fold, 2 back pieces cut on the selvedge) and were slightly flared (which I like because the child can run around a little easier). I merely had to measure how long I needed them to be, that is, from the Regency waistline to the floor. The gathers of the skirt were all pulled to the centre back.

Step Six: The sleeve pieces were a bit more tricky. For the oversleeve, I flat-patterned the sleeve based on some other sleeves I had made, and then I just adjusted it to fit on the dress. You can use the extant pattern link above as a starting point, or use a tutorial for patterning puffed sleeves. I made it quite puffy, mainly because it is easier to make it smaller but impossible to make it larger if you have cut it too small!

The undersleeve was a very basic symmetrical shape, which I have sketched below.

The undersleeve was a symmetrical piece (even though it doesn't appear so from my hurried sketch).

The undersleeve is a symmetrical piece (even though it doesn’t appear so from my hurried sketch).

Step Seven: For the neckline, I sewed bias binding to the raw neckline edge (right sides together) and then folded it to the inside, leaving none of the binding visible. It was machine sewn down to make a casing. I threaded a piece of cotton tape through the casing and then pulled in the neckline to fit. Rather than having to tie it up at the back, I sewed the tape to the casing at the centre back to secure it.

Step Eight: The last parts to do were the hem, the dorset buttons and buttonholes.

The dorset buttons and buttonholes. You can see the centre back gathers on the skirt, as well as the piping around the bottom edge of the puffed sleeve. The bias binding is also visible around the inside of the front neckline.

The dorset buttons and buttonholes completed. You can see the centre back gathers on the skirt, as well as the piping around the bottom edge of the puffed sleeve. The bias binding is also visible around the inside of the front neckline.

Here are some pictures of the finished dress worn during the Festival promenade on the Sunday morning.

The front view

The front view

girls regency dress back

The back view (with some dorset buttons popped off, which were replaced later).

I found this process to be a good way to practise draping and drafting. I hope it encourages you to try it too!

Related Posts

How to make a Basic Regency Girl’s Dress

Dress-ups for a Girl

Dress-ups for a Baby

Sources and Relevant Links

Draping on a Dressform – by Craftsy

Draping on a stand for beginners (a snippet of a longer course) – Youtube tutorial

How to draft a puffed sleeve – at Sewing Mamas forum

How to make Dorset Buttons – by Potter Wright & Webb

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